A Vision of Rosalind Franklin
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By Denise Wyllie and Clare O Hagan

A Vision of Rosalind Franklin

By Denise Wyllie and Clare O Hagan


Scientist Rosalind Franklin, who made the first clear X-ray images of the structure of DNA, died of ovarian cancer in 1958 at age 37. Franklin’s image “Photo 51” was crucial to the identification of DNA’s double helix structure by Francis Crick and James Watson, who shared the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery in 1962. At the time, Franklin, who was not eligible for the prize posthumously, was largely unrecognized for her role.

We first learned about Franklin during an art residency at a research laboratory in London. Her vision of DNA and her life story inspired our work, particularly because one of us (Clare O Hagan) was also diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

To make a mixed-media exhibition of artwork that celebrates Franklin’s contribution to science, we combined painting, printmaking, model making in resin, digital technology and video. “A Vision of Rosalind I” is one of the prints in our collection, which has been exhibited internationally.


To see "A Vision of Rosalind I," please refer to the print magazine.


For more information about Wyllie O Hagan’s art, visit www.wyllieohagan.com.